The Vaccine Push – Mandatory Laws vs. Personal Choice

 

Mandatory Laws vs. Personal Choice

Front-page headlines about questionable research, corporate manipulations, purchased politicians, medical cover-ups and whistleblower reports have left Americans feeling hoodwinked and skeptical. According to a new Pew Research Center study, the public doesn’t trust the information they’re fed on issues such as genetically engineered crops and now, mandatory vaccines.

The current state of distrust of scientific statistics and their impact on our lives doesn’t bode well for lawmakers attempting to build consensus for uniform mandatory vaccination intervention. The current rush to pass such legislation is largely due to 169 cases of measles reported between January 4 and April 17, encompassing 20 states and the District of Columbia, all traced to a traveler infected overseas that then visited a California amusement park.

Common sense and independent research counters the stance that would rob individuals of their moral right to conscientious, philosophical and personal-belief exemption from being subjected to vaccines. Hard evidence in a plethora of published studies further identifies genetic factors that could cause the development of adverse effects to vaccines.

Yet, “There is no available evidence on vaccines’ effectiveness that is placebo-controlled, plus the health effects of vaccines in combination have never been studied, certainly not the 69 total doses of 16 types of vaccines given to children starting 12 hours after birth through age 18,” says Sayer Ji, a member of the National Health Federation board of governors and founder ofGreenMedInfo.com.

Mandatory vaccines pose the latest affront to citizens’ right to informed self-government.

“Vaccine risks for anyone can range from zero to 100 percent, depending upon one’s genes, microbiome DNA, environment, age and health at the time of vaccination and the type and number of vaccines given,” advises Barbara Loe Fisher, president and co-founder of the nonprofit National Vaccine Information Center, headquartered in Vienna, Virginia.

“Vaccines are not safe or effective for everyone because we’re not all the same and we don’t all respond the same way to pharmaceutical products,” says Fisher. She notes that responses to infectious diseases and the risk for complications can also vary, depending upon similar factors.

Among the most prominent warnings on vaccine ingredients, concerned doctors, researchers and medical whistleblowers cite dangers of the toxin thimerosal, a mercury-containing preservative used in some vaccines and vaccine adjuvants such as aluminum gels or aluminum salts added to elicit a stronger immune response against the germ the vaccine introduces into our body.

What to Ask Before Vaccinating
Vaccines are pharmaceutical products that carry risks. The National Vaccine Information Center encourages parents to become fully informed about the potential risks and disease complications for their own children and pose these questions to one or more trusted healthcare professionals before making a decision.
• Am I, or my child, sick right now?
• Have I, or my child, had a bad reaction to a vaccination before?
• Do I, or my child, have a personal or family history of vaccine reactions, neurological disorders, severe allergies or immune system problems?
• Do I know the disease and vaccine risks for my child or myself?
• Do I have full information about the vaccine’s side effects?
• Do I know how to identify and report a vaccine reaction?
• Will I have a written record, including the vaccine manufacturer’s name and lot number, for all vaccinations?
• Am I convinced that I have the right to make an informed choice?

Visit nvic.org for information on recognizing vaccine-reaction symptoms.

Leading books citing telling research include Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak, by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and Dr. Mark Hyman; Vaccines: What CDC Documents and Science Reveal, by Dr. Sherri Tenpenny; Vaccine Epidemic, by Louise Kuo Habakus; and Science for Sale, by David L. Lewis, Ph.D. Top film documentaries include Shots in the DarkVaccination: The Hidden Truth;Trace AmountsThe Greater Good; and Vaccine Nation.

Bought: The Hidden Story Behind Vaccines, Big Pharma and Your Food resulted from two years of investigative research in disaster medical management by Toni Bark, now an integrative physician. In interviews with practicing doctors, research scientists, former pharmaceutical sales representatives, attorneys and others, Bark exposes serious conflicts of interest. These include vaccine research funding, hiring between pharmaceutical and chemical industries and their government regulating agencies, sponsored scientific propaganda used to silence critics, and large-scale corruption within the billion-dollar vaccine industry. Plus, it points out problems with the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986 that Congress passed to give drug manufacturers, the government and physicians protection from lawsuits arising from injuries caused by childhood vaccines.

Vaccines are not responsible for the eradication of diseases such as polio and smallpox.
~U.S. Centers for Disease Control database

“Since 1988, thousands of children and adults in America that have suffered brain inflammation and other long-recognized vaccine reactions have been collectively awarded $3 billion in vaccine injury compensation. There are thousands more that have been unable to secure federal compensation for their vaccine injuries,” reports Fisher.

“At least 25,000 to 30,000 reports of vaccine reactions are filed annually with the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System, operated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control,” says Tenpenny. “Underreporting is a substantial problem. It’s estimated that less than 1 percent of all adverse events from drugs and vaccines are reported.” VaccineResearchLibrary.com cites 7,200 journal articles and studies that expose the harm caused by vaccines.

“Knowledge is empowering and personal discernment is priceless. The facts challenge the health claims by government health agencies and pharmaceutical firms that vaccines are perfectly safe,” says Ji. “Public doubt, distrust and skepticism are rational and natural consequences.”

For more information, visit the National Vaccine Information Center at nvic.org and the coalition of citizen advocates at NationalHealthFreedom.org.

Connect with writer Linda Sechrist at ItsAllAboutWe.com.

Posted in August 2015

Joe Dispenza on The Power of Thought Alone to Heal

 

Most of us are familiar with the placebo effect, when actual healing occurs after the only prescription a patient ingests is a sugar pill that the individual believes is medicine.

Researcher and Chiropractor Joe Dispenza, of Olympia, Washington, knows the value of the placebo effect from personal experience. When his spine shattered during a 1986 triathlon race as his bicycle was hit by an SUV, he had a good mental picture of what had happened. Consulting doctors proclaimed a bleak prognosis and offered a risky surgical procedure as his only chance of walking again.

He left the hospital against the advice of his physicians and spent the next three months mentally—and physically—reconstructing his spine. His story is one of hope for healing for others, detailed in his latest book, You Are the Placebo: Making Your Mind Matter.

How did your pivotal healing take place?

For two hours twice a day, I went within and began creating a picture of my intended result: a totally healed spine. Nine-and-a-half weeks after the accident, I got up and walked back into my life fully recovered—without having had a body cast or surgeries. I resumed my chiropractic practice 10 weeks out and was training and lifting weights again while continuing my rehabilitation regimen at 12 weeks. Now, in the nearly 30 years since the accident, I can honestly say that I rarely experience any back pain.

How does your approach differ from mind over matter?

It’s the same. So many people have been conditioned into believing that mind and body are separate things. There is never a time when the mind isn’t influencing the body and vice versa. The combination is what I call a state of being.

How does the placebo effect work?

Think about the idea of giving somebody a sugar pill, saline solution or a false surgery. A certain percentage of those people will accept, believe and surrender—without analysis—to the “thought” that they are receiving the real substance or treatment. As a result, they’ll program their autonomic nervous systems to manufacture the exact same pharmacy of drugs to match the real substance or treatment. They can make their own antidepressants and painkilling medicines. Healing is not something that takes place outside of you.

Can you cite examples of disease in which self-healing has been scientifically validated?

There is amazing power in the human mind. Some people’s thoughts heal them; some have made them sick and sometimes even hastened their death.

In the first chapter of You Are the Placebo, I tell a story about one man who died after being told he had cancer, even though an autopsy revealed he’d been misdiagnosed. A woman plagued by depression for decades improved dramatically and permanently during an antidepressant drug trial, despite the fact that she was in the placebo group. A handful of veterans that participated in a Baylor University study, formerly hobbled by osteoarthritis, were miraculously cured by fake knee surgeries. Plus, scientists have seen sham coronary bypass surgeries that resulted in healing for 83 percent of participants (New England Journal of Medicine). A study of Parkinson’s disease from the University of British Columbia measured better motor coordination for half of the patients after a placebo injection. They were all healed by thought alone. The list goes on.

I’ve personally witnessed many people heal themselves using the same principles of the placebo response, once they understood how, from cancers, multiple sclerosis, lupus, thyroid conditions and irritable bowel syndrome.

How can an ordinary person make that quantum leap and find healing?

Many of us are now recognizing that rather than live in the past, we can create our own future. It requires changing some longstanding conditioned beliefs and the willingness to step into an unfamiliar, uncomfortable, unpredictable state that is consistent with living in the unknown. This happens to be the perfect place from which to create change.

I recommend a meditation that creates physiological changes in the brain and at the cellular level, from 45 to 60 minutes a day. Changing Beliefs and Perceptions meditations are available on my website or individuals can record themselves reading the texts printed in the back of my book.

As we exchange self-limiting beliefs we begin to embody new possibilities.

Joe Dispenza is chairman of Life University Research Council and a faculty member for the International Quantum University for Integrative Medicine, Omega Institute for Holistic Studies and Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health. Visit DrJoeDispenza.com.

Connect with natural health books author Kathleen Barnes at KathleenBarnes.com.

Posted in August 2015

Green Arts – Tips for Finding Safe Eco-Supplies

 

Tips for Finding Safe Eco-Supplies

“Creative energy is contagious,” says Kim Harris, co-owner of Yucandu, a hands-on craft studio in Webster Groves, Missouri. As one client crafter commented, “Art is cheaper than therapy and a lot more fun.” It doubles the pleasure when we trust the nature of our supplies.

Arts and crafts stir the imagination, spur creativity and are relaxing. Yet, for some, allergies, chemical sensitivities and eco-consciousness can make choosing materials a challenge. Manufacturers are not required to list heavy metals, toxic preservatives or petroleum-based ingredients, even when they’re labeled “non-toxic”.

User- and environment-friendly alternatives may be difficult to locate, but are worth the effort. After working with paint, glue, chalk and modeling dough, children may lick their fingers and be reluctant to wash hands thoroughly. Retirees with newfound time for hobbies may also have weakened immune systems at risk to chemical exposure. Everyone benefits from minimizing exposure to toxins.

Papers

For greeting cards, scrapbooking or mixed media, paper provides background, texture, pattern and color. Tree-free paper uses agricultural residue or fibers from bananas, coffee and tobacco, andEcoPaper.com researchers anticipate similar future use of pineapples, oranges and palm hearts.

Labels can be misleading. White paper has been bleached. Processed chlorine-free (PCF) means no bleaching occurred during this incarnation of the paper. Totally chlorine-free (TCF) papers are as advertised. Paper is called recycled if it’s 100 percent postconsumer-recovered fiber—anything less is recycled content.

Glues

For most projects, purchased glues are more convenient, longer lasting and easier to use than homemade. White glue and white paste, called “library paste”, are best with porous items like wood, paper, plastic and cloth. It takes longer to dry and needs to be held in place, but there are no fumes.

“Jewelry is wearable art, so for mine, I primarily use water-based, non-toxic glues and sealers that simply wash off my hands,” advises Nancy Kanter, owner and designer of Sparkling Vine Design, in Thousand Oaks, California. Examples include Elmer’s Washable and Mod Podge.

Airplane glue, rubber cement, spray adhesive and epoxy all emit toxic fumes. Instant glue (cyanoacrylate) likewise bonds fast to fingers; toxic, foul-smelling acetate (used in nail polish remover) is needed to remedy the situation.

Paints

Water-based tempera paint is easy to use; Chroma brand tempera removes some of the hazardous ingredients. “I use water-based, non-toxic acrylic paints and wine to paint recycled wine corks for my designs,” says Kanter. “This avoids harsh fumes and chemicals.”

If paint, glue, chalk or markers have a strong odor or the label says, “Use in a well-ventilated area,” it’s toxic.

Note that acrylic paint can contain ammonia or formaldehyde. Oil paint produces fumes and requires turpentine, a petroleum-based product, to clean brushes. Aerosol spray paint is easily inhaled unless protective equipment is used.

Markers and Crayons

“Give kids great supplies and they’ll make great art,” maintains Harris. “They’ll also be respectful of how much they use.”

Go for unscented, water-based markers, especially for younger children that are as apt to draw on themselves as on paper. Soy crayons are made from sustainable soybean oil, while retaining bright colors. Dustless chalk is preferred by some. Colored eco-pencils are another option.

Beware of conventional dry erase markers, which contain the neurotoxin xylene; permanent markers emit fumes. Wax crayons are made with paraffin, a petroleum-based product.

Yarn and Other Fibers

For knit or crochet projects, choose recycled silk and cotton or bamboo, soy silk from tofu byproducts, or natural, sustainable corn silk. Sheep’s wool, organic cotton or alpaca fibers, raw or hand-dyed with natural colors, are environmentally friendly.

Rayon is recycled wood pulp treated with caustic soda, ammonia, acetone and sulfuric acid. Nylon, made from petroleum products, may have a harmful finish.

More Materials

Canvas is typically stretched on birch framing, a sustainable wood. Look for unbleached, organic cotton canvas without primer. Runoff from an organic cotton field doesn’t pollute waterways.

Experiment with homemade modeling clay. Many tutorials and photos are available online. Commercial modeling clay contains wheat flour, which can cause a reaction for the gluten-sensitive. For papier-mâché projects, recycle newsprint and use white glue, thinned with water. Premade, packaged versions may contain asbestos fibers. Eco-beads with safe finishes vary from nuts and seeds to glass and stone. For grownups that like to create their own beads, realize that polymer clays contain vinyl/PVC.

In making artistic expression safe, being conscious of the materials used is paramount.

Connect with the freelance writer via AveryMack@mindspring.com.

Posted in August 2015

Kid Cookery – They Love Healthy Food They Make Themselves

 

They Love Healthy Food They Make Themselves

In less than a generation, childhood obesity has risen substantially, most notably in the United States, according to the article “Child and Adolescent Obesity: Part of a Bigger Picture,” in a recent issue of The Lancet. The authors attest that modern culture’s promotion of junk food encourages weight gain and can exacerbate risk factors for chronic disease in our kids.

When concerned parents have a picky child bent on eating only French fries, they could enroll them in healthy cooking classes that offer tastings and related hands-on experiences for youths from preschoolers through teens. Here, children are encouraged to try more foods, eat healthier and learn about meal preparation, plus sharpen some math, geography and social skills.

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Leah Smith, the mother of two elementary school children, founded Kids Kitchen and Chefs Club, in Austin, Texas, in 2011. She offers classes for chefs (ages 3 to 6), junior chefs (5 to 11) and senior chefs (11 to 14). Kids learn how to make dishes such as yogurt parfait popsicles with healthy grains clusters or roasted tomato soup with homemade croutons. “I’m a firm believer that teaching kids about which foods are good for us, and why, will positively influence their lifelong eating habits,” says Smith. “Start right, stay right.”

Elena Marre, also the mother of two elementary school children, faced the challenge of a picky eater in her family. In 2007, she started The Kids’ Table, in Chicago, and solved her own problem along the way. Says Marre, “It’s amazing how often I hear a child complain about not liking red peppers, dark leafy greens or onions at the beginning of a class. It’s so rewarding when that same child is devouring a dish made with those three ingredients at the end.”

Healthy kids cooking classes provide a fresh way to combat poverty, according to the Children’s Aid Society, in New York City. The group started Go!Chefs in 2006 at community schools and centers throughout the city and knows how to make it fun with Iron Chef-style competitions.

Kids like simple, elemental tastes and embrace the magic of the three-ingredient approach to cooking.
~Rozanne Gold, Eat Fresh Food: Awesome Recipes for Teen Chefs

“When offered a choice between an apple and a candy on two consecutive occasions and with most having chosen the candy the first time, 57 percent of students in the Go!Kids health and fitness program chose the apple the second time, compared to 33 percent in the control group,” says Stefania Patinella, director of the society’s food and nutrition programs.

In Minnesota’s Twin Cities region, “We do a lot of outreach with Head Start, community schools and organizations like scout troops,” says Chef Ani Loizzo, Whole Foods Market’s culinary instructor at the Whole Kids Club Kitchen Camp, in Lake Calhoun. “We have many kids that know about organic and biodynamic farming and we talk about that in class. We might focus on a healthy ingredient like tomatoes in a one-hour class or explore the culture of Greece or Mexico through food in a longer session.”

Loizzo loves the natural curiosity that kids bring to cooking classes. “Sparking an interest in exploring ingredients and flavors can also lead to learning how to grow a garden and interest in the environment,” she says.

For children in areas where such cooking classes aren’t yet offered, there are still fun ways to involve them in healthy meal preparation. Maggie LaBarbera of San Mateo, California, started her Web-based company NourishInteractive.com in 2005 after witnessing the harmful effects of teenage obesity when she was an intensive care nurse. It offers educational articles for parents and free downloadable activities that engage children with healthy foods.

“Every positive change, no matter how small, is a step to creating a healthier child,” says LaBarbera. “Together, we can give children the knowledge, facts and skills to develop healthy habits for a lifetime.”

Judith Fertig blogs at AlfrescoFoodAndLifestyle.blogspot.com from Overland Park, KS.

Starter Recipes for Kids

Courtesy of TxKidsKitchen.com

Courtesy of TxKidsKitchen.com

Here’s a sampling of healthy snack food recipes that kids love to make—and eat—in class and at home.

 

Yogurt Parfait Ice Pops with Healthy Grains Clusters

Yields: 4 servings

4 ice pop molds
1 cup granola (use non-GMO, gluten-free Kind bars) in small pieces
1 cup organic fresh fruit such as raspberries, kiwi, mango and strawberries cut into small pieces
2 (6-oz) cartons organic dairy or non-dairy yogurt

Layer ingredients in each ice pop mold like a parfait. Put a sprinkle of granola in first, and then layer yogurt and fresh cut fruit. Add another spoonful of granola to top it all off and freeze the pops for at least 4 to 6 hours.

Adapted from a recipe by Leah Smith for Kids Kitchen and Chefs Club, in Austin, Texas

Raw Banana Ice Cream

Yields: about 1 quart

photo by Stephen Blancett

photo by Stephen Blancett

20 pitted dates, roughly chopped
2 Tbsp raw honey
2 Tbsp extra-virgin coconut oil
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/8 tsp ground cinnamon
4 cups sliced very ripe organic bananas
½ cup raw peanuts, coarsely chopped, optional
2 Tbsp cacao nibs

 

Put dates into a medium bowl, cover with lukewarm purified water and set aside to soak for 10 minutes. Drain dates and reserve soaking liquid. In a food processor, purée dates with 3 to 4 tablespoons of the soaking liquid, honey, oil, vanilla and cinnamon until smooth. (Discard the remaining liquid.) Add bananas and purée again until almost smooth.

Transfer to a stainless steel bowl and stir in peanuts and cacao nibs. Cover and freeze, stirring occasionally, until almost solid—4 to 6 hours. Let ice cream soften a bit at room temperature before serving.

Adapted from a recipe from Whole Foods Market, Lake Calhoun, Minnesota

Nut Butter Granola Bars

Yields: 8 bars

2¼ cups rolled oats
¼ cup shredded coconut (without added sugar)
½ cup applesauce
1/3 cup nut butter (almond or peanut)

photo by Stephen Blancett

photo by Stephen Blancett


¼ tsp baking soda
½ cup raw honey or maple syrup
1 Tbsp milk or almond milk
3 Tbsp chocolate chips

 

Preheat the oven to 350° F. Mix all dry ingredients in one bowl. Mix wet ingredients into a separate bowl; it may help to heat the nut butter a little first. Combine the wet and dry contents. Line a 9-by-13-inch pan with parchment paper. Bake for about 25 minutes. Let them cool completely before cutting. Store in a plastic container separated by parchment paper. They should keep for about two weeks and may be refrigerated.

Adapted from a recipe by Kensey Goebel for Kids Kitchen and Chefs Club, in Austin, Texas

Cheesy Lasagna Rolls

Yields: 4 to 6 servings

Sea salt
½ lb (8 to 10) uncooked lasagna noodles
Organic olive or coconut oil
1 cup ricotta cheese
1½ cups prepared marinara sauce
1½ cups packed baby spinach
½ cup shredded mozzarella

photo by Stephen Blancett

photo by Stephen Blancett

Preheat oven to 400° F. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, add noodles and cook until al dente, 8 to 10 minutes. Drain well and gently transfer to a clean surface.

 

Oil the inside of a small roasting pan or casserole dish and set it aside. Working with one noodle at a time, spread with about 2 tablespoons each of the ricotta and marinara, then top with spinach. Starting at one end, roll up the noodle snugly, and then arrange it in the pan either seam-side down or with the rolls close enough to hold each other closed. Pour the remaining marinara over assembled rolls, sprinkle with mozzarella and bake until golden and bubbly, 20 to 25 minutes.

Adapted from a recipe from Whole Foods Market

Posted in August 2015

Speaking with Strangers – The Simple Pleasures of Connecting

 

The Simple Pleasures of Connecting

Technology tends to isolate us from others, but science points to the real value in reaching out. On average, we come into contact with more than 100 people a day, but often may not make any real connection with them.

On a typical college campus, it’s rare to see a student not plugged in while walking from class to class. Saying “Hi” to an acquaintance or complimenting someone in passing is nearly impossible. These little day-to-day interactions could provide a steady source of simple pleasures for all if we regularly made the most of such opportunities.

Part of the reason we intentionally isolate ourselves might be the false belief that we’ll be happier by doing so, according to a recent University of Chicago study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology. When subway riders were asked how they thought they would feel if they spoke to a stranger, nearly all of them predicted that the ride would be “less pleasant” than if they kept to themselves. After the ride, however, the results were unanimous: Those that spoke to another person reported having a more positive experience than those that sat in silence.

Parents teach children not to talk to strangers, but as adults, we miss a lot if we don’t. Even small talk can make a big difference in the quality of our day. It’s easy to try it to see if we don’t end up with a smile on our face.

It’s ironic that young people spend hours each day on social networking sites, texting others and making plans with friends so they won’t sit alone at night, yet are getting worse at making such connections face-to-face. Even seated at the same table, conversational eye contact is becoming a lost art, another casualty of technology.

Talking with others correlates with better communication skills, too. A 20-year study from Stanford University concluded that its most successful MBA graduates were those that showed the highest interests and skills in talking with others.

So, instead of shying away from chatting with a fellow commuter or asking a cashier how her day is going, say “Hello.” It’s bound to make everyone’s day better.

Violet Decker is a freelance writer in New York City. Connect at VDecker95@gmail.com.

Posted in August 2015